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Moore Kirkpatrick
Born January 21, 1854
Elwood Kirkpatrick
Born October 30, 1865


Moore Kirkpatrick, Sr., the father of the gentlemen whose names head this sketch, was one of the best examples of the sturdy sons Ireland is sending this country. He was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, December 8, 1826, a son of Thompson and Elizabeth (Story) Kirkpatrick, who brought him to America, locating in Philadelphia when about eleven years of age. Both parents died in Pennsylvania. Thompson Kirkpatrick was a school and music teacher and was kindly remembered for many years by his pupils who loved the kindly old Irish gentleman. The children born to Thompson Kirkpatrick and wife were seven in number, namely: Moore, John, William J., Ellen, Anne, Elizabeth and Martha.
The education of Moore Kirkpatrick, Sr., was secured in Philadelphia and there he also learned the trade of a painter and grainer and followed it after locating in Iowa. His advent in this state occurred in 1866, when he reached Cedar county, but his permanent settlement here was made when he located in Hale township, Jones county, in the spring of 1867. This locality continued to be his home until his demise, which occurred July 9, 1876. Upon coming here Mr. Kirkpatrick settled upon one hundred and twenty acres of land, which he improved, and he kept adding to his holdings until he owned about five hundred acres. He was a public-spirited man and held a number of the township offices, espousing at all times the principles of the republican party.
On the 19th of May, 1848, Moore Kirkpatrick, Sr., married Annie M. Scott who was born in Ireland, July 4, 1825, and was brought to Philadelphia by her parents when she was about fifteen years old. Mrs. Kirkpatrick passed away, deeply lamented, August 24, 1888. She bore her husband six children, two of whom died in infancy, the others being: William, who died unmarried, in January, 1888, aged thirty-six years, for he was born July 13, 1852; Moore was born January 21, 1854 and resides on a part of the homestead; Dr. John W., a physician, who was born October 9, 1862, and died May 9, 1903, at Wyoming, Jones county, leaving a wife and four children; and Elwood, who was born October 30, 1865, and now resides on a part of the homestead. These children were born in Philadelphia.
Moore and Elwood Kirkpatrick came with their parents to Hale township, Jones county, Iowa, in 1867 and after the death of their father they had charge of the estate under the firm name of Kirkpatrick brothers until 1892, when they divided the five hundred and sixty-six acres of land that they had held in common and made some changes. Moore Kirkpatrick now owns two hundred and twenty-three acres, including the old home on section 35, Hale township, while Elwood owns four hundred and twenty-three acres, two hundred and twenty acres of which are in Cedar county, and the remainder in Jones county, his farm being on the county line. His residence, however, is on section 36, Hale township. Elwood feeds about two hundred head of stock annually. He is a strong republican and at present is one of the township board of trustees. In 1890 he married Lucy Vaughn, who was born August 23, 1868, near Wyoming, Jones county, a daughter of P. L. and Lydia (Baldwin) Vaughn, the former of whom is deceased, but the latter survives and lives in Wyoming. Mr. and Mrs. Elwood Kirkpatrick have three children, namely: William Howard, Harry Elwood and Marian Lucy. Religiously he is a member of the Clarence Presbyterian church. Moore Kirkpatrick is unmarried.
These young men are progressive farmers who have done much to raise the standard of agricultural life in their community. Their fertile acres yield them comfortable incomes and they are public-spirited enough to desire to assist in anything that looks toward the advancement of neighborhood interests.

Source: History of Jones County, Iowa, Past and Present, R. M. Corbitt, S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., Chicago, 1910, p. 392.

Moore Kirkpatrick
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