[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Jones logo
April 6, 1871 COMPLETE PAPER!

1857-1859

1860s

CENTENNIAL EDITION
August 18, 1938

space

space

space

Gold Found at Bowen's Prairie
A number of the prominent business men of Dubuque have been out "prospecting" for gold, and were rewarded by finding the metal at Bowen's Prairie, in this County: We take the following from their report:
On Whitewater Creek we washed out by pan, and in almost every pan we found small particles of gold, mingled with black sand. We then went to Bowen's Prairie, on the edge north of the military road, and prospected about from three to four hours. We found some specimens here larger than on Whitewater, but it did not seem to be so well distributed over the ground. June 21, 1858
VISITTO LANGWORTHY
Last week we visited the young but flourishing town of Langworthy, on the Dubuque Western Railroad. The town already has a store, post-office, hotel and quite a number of dwellings. We were informed by Mt. Andrews that about a dozen buildings would be erected as soon as the lumber could be obtained. June 21, 1858
David Graham built the first brick house in the county.
SUDDEN DEPARTURE
DISTRICT COURT- State of Iowa vs. Jesse Tennery. Indictment in Linn Co. Court for an attempt to commit arson. Tried in this Court on a change of venue, and convicted. Sentence, two years in Penitentiary.
May 13, 1859
Jesse Tennery, the young man from Linn county convicted for attempt at arson, not liking the prospect of losing his beautiful curls and serving two years in the Penitentiary, took "French leave" of his keepers last Wednesday night, and has not been heard of since. He persuaded his keepers to remove his bracelets, so as to enable him and Penderghast to indulge in a game of euchre. While they were playing, the keepers fell asleep, and Tennery's interest in the game suddenly abated, and he took a hasty departure by jumping from the second story window of the Wapsipinicon House, to which place they were confined. Sheriff Noble offers $25 reward for him.
The following is a description of Tennery: He is about (?) years old, 5 feet 6 inches high, slim build, long dark, curling hair, light complexion, dark piercing eyes. Had on mouse-colored pants, light colored frock coat, cashmere and red check flannel shirt with a buff color.
May 13, 1859
Jesse Tennery, the young man who escaped from "durance vile" last week, after receiving his sentence, was re-captured near Bowen's Prairie, the day after his escape, by Stephen Ross, and brought back to town. Being unacquainted with the country, he missed his way and got on the military road, where he was soon overhauled by Mr. Ross, who very kindly gave him his breakfast and a free ride back to Anamosa.
Sheriff Noble started last Monday for Ft. Madison, taking with him Tennery and Penderghast. May 20, 1859

A post office has been established at Fuller's Mills, two and a half miles north of Johnson P.O. in this county, and Mr. John II. Fuller appointed postmaster. It willbe known as Fuller's Mills post-office.
Mr. J.C. Stone has been appointed post-master at Johnson. May 13, 1859
Literary Attainments
The Ladies of Fairview, on the evening of the 7th instant, gave an exhibition of their literary and scholastic attainments that reflected credit on themselves and the community in which they live.
The exercises of the evening consisted of original essays, dialogues and declamations, with an occasional glee and music on the melodeon by Mr. Stacy of Anamosa. The music was well received by the large and respectable audience, and for which the ladies tender to Mr. Stacy their grateful thanks.
Fairview is quite a literary village.-The people take great interest in good schools, and appear to be apprised of the fact that without industry there is no excellence. No place in the county has a better locality for a High School than here, and in no place would a school be better supported. August 13, 1858
SUGARCANE
The flood, which was a foot or more above, corn, potatoes and every thing else in the field of G.H. Ford, Esq., has entirely subsided, and the result is this: Every kind of crop in that field is dead except the crop of Chinese Sugar Cane—comprising about an acre—which is still alive, green and flourishing. Thus the fact is established that sugar cane cannot be drowned out in a week. We leave agricultural chemists to explain it.
August 13, 1858

Fish in the Wapsipinicon, and the Buffalo are exceedingly abundant. On Saturday last, we saw a Salmon in the hands of one of the fishers at the bridge.
BLACKBERRIES
Blackberries just now constitute one of our "peculiar" institutions. For the past two weeks, the town has been rife with blackberries. Everybody has been blackberrying. Old men and old women, young men and young women, married men and wives, lovers and sweet-hearts, old maids-we don't believe we have any of that description-and old bachelors, have all been blackberrying. Carriages and buggies and farmer's wagons and vehicles of every variety have been in requisition to carry and bring home the blackberryers. During the flood, when the "Old Wapsie" was half a mile wide, three boats were busy all day long ferrying over the crowd of blackberry gatherers at five cents a head. Through the whole forenoon of each day, there was a constant stream of blackberry hunters crossing the river by boat or bridge for "Brown's" or "Hester's," or some other point; and through the whole after-noon, the same continuous stream of blackberrians was on its return with tubs, baskets and buckets full of blackberries. Not until a late hour in the evening did we cease to see men wending their way home with each a half bushel or so of blackberries. All went out to the blackberry gathering in high spirits, and all seemed to come home more or less fagged or weary, and some complaining of the heat. Yet it was clear that the pleasures they enjoyed were greater than the inconveniences resulting from the hot sun, scratched hands, torn clothes, and joltings over an uneven road made ten times worse by the late heavy rains. The woods have been full of blackberries and almost as full of blackberry pickers, and never was the proverb "as plenty as blackberries," more appropriate or truthful. Blackberry time gives humanity one or several holidays while it lasts; and in many respects, it is as good as a Fourth of July, or any other of our celebration days. Not only all above in-fancy enjoy its excitement, but the very babies cry if not permitted to mingle in the fun. Blackberry time as it is now, is always a time of quiet, active, delicious enjoyment. Blessings on blackberries!
August 13, 1858
NewHardware Store in Anamosa
A. HEITCHEN would respect-fully inform the he keeps on hand, and is constantly receiving the newest styles of Stoves, Hardware, & c., consisting in Cooking, Parlor and Box Stoves, Hollow Ware, of every description, Sad Irons, Axes, of the best quality, Nails of every description, & c. He also keeps on hand a large stock of Plantshed, Japaned, and Plain Tin-Ware of our own manufacture, which he warrants, and will sell at very low prices. He is prepared to do Roofing, Spouting, and all kinds of Job Work on short notice, and in a neat and workman-like manner. If you wish good Bargains, good Stoves and good Ware, give him a call before purchasing else-where. Country merchants sup-plies on the most reasonable terms.
Also, four Tin Pedlars wanted.
Place of business on Main-st., next door to A.P. Carter's Store. May 24, 1858
The Fisher House
We paid a visit to that noble structure on last Friday, and as we passed from room to room, we were somewhat astonished and delighted, Astonished at the magnificence of the furniture, the finish of the rooms, &c., and delighted to think that we were soon to have a Hotel in the town of Anamosa that cannot be surpassed in the State. The parlors are furnished in the very best style; the family rooms with everything that can make the occupants comfortable. The bed-rooms are furnished in good style, all the floors being carpeted, and those of the parlor, with the finest quality. The table, that which is of great interest to the weary traveler, will, as we are assured, be furnished with the best that the country affords. And as Mr. Peaslee, of the Peaslee House, Dubuque, is the proprietor we think will be a sufficient guarantee that everything will be done to the satisfaction of their guests, even to the bill.
Convenient to the hotel is one of the best barns in the State, furnished with everything necessary for the comfort of horses, and the foals of prancing steeds. Attached to the barn are ample sheds to protect carriages or loaded wagons. September 1, 1857
CATHOLIC CHURCH
We understand that our Catholic citizens are making preparations to erect a Church some time during the present season. Wm. T. Shaw, Esq., has donated four lots lying in the upper part of town, suitable for the building. Others have donated building material, stone, &c. June 7, 1858
ANAMOSA GROWING
Men who come to town, after an absence of one and two years, scarcely recognize Anamosa. Such is their own remark. The many new structures built and building, especially on the table land in the east part, taken in connection with the old or lower portions and its constant progress, give the appearance of a large-spread village to the place. The Fisher House is complete externally, and nearly so internally, and will soon be open to the public. Dr. Sales is constructing a palatial residence of convenience and beauty on one of the hills which surround the town and give it an amphitheater-like appearance. The parsonage of the Congregational Church is finishing on a second elevated point. Mr. Crane is building on a third; and Mr. McDaniels is preparing to build on a fourth. So we go. Structures rise almost daily, and even before we are aware of the intention of the owners. This is healthy progress, and everybody, save doctors and lawyers, has his hands full and is in a hurry. Give us the railroads, traversing the country north, south, east, west, as well as the centre, thereby enabling any man to reach any part of the county in an hour's time, or less, and at half the present cost of stage fare, and Anamosa, Fairview, Rome, Monticello, Bowen's Prairie, Wyoming and other towns will soon number their population each by thousands, and the county at large by tens of thousands. It is no extravagance to say that such an influx of population would raise the value of uncultivated lands fifty to five hundred percent. Many times the amount of produce would be raised that is raised now, and all the surplus could be readily and cheaply exported to feed the millions of the east and of Europe. Let us have the railroads. They are indispensable to ourselves as to the rest of the worldwithout them, we are as dead as Egypt. July 14, 1857
Fatal Catastrophe
Joseph Bowers and Willis Arnold, on last Tuesday, while engaged in digging a well for John Crow, six miles north of this place, met with a serious accident. They has sunk the well some twenty-five feet in the sand, put in cribbing about fourteen feet from the top, and were sinking below the cribbing in gravel, when Mr. Bowers, who had only a few moments before descended into the well, heard something crack and started up the cribbing; but was assured by Mr. Arnold that he saw nothing wrong. Hardly, however, were the words out of his mouth before the well, for fifteen feet around above the cribbing, caved in, covering Bowers up fifteen feet; and after five hours of hard work, by the neighbors, he was taken out, but the vital spark had fled. Mr. Bowers leaves a wife and four small children to mourn his untimely death.
We also learn that while Mr. Jacob Byerly, six miles east of here, on last Wednesday, was cleaning out his well, the wall fell in, injuring him seriously. The greatest wonder is that he was not killed instantly.
July 14, 1857
1860s

space

BOWEN'S PRAIRIE
Including Richland Township
A Spunky Colored Woman
"Aunt Aery," the better half of our colored drayman, Reuben Reed, embarked a few days ago on the Dubuque South-western to make a visit to her relatives in Mississippi, where she and her husband resided until the latter part of the war. Reuben and his wife were slaves and were brought north by Col. Shaw near the close of the rebellion. "Aunt Aery" got off at Farley with the intention of stopping over night, but was refused sleeping accommodations. She was so indignant that she forthwith started on foot on her return home and reached Worthington in the evening, remaining there over night. In the morning she was still too much disgusted to wait for the train or anything else, resumed her journey and, after a hard jaunt, arrived at home safe and sound. It is said that the Col., when the news of the treatment that she had received came to his ears, did some pretty tall "blessing" for the benefit of the saints at Farley.Nov-Dec 1866
MARRIED
At the residence of Josephus Crane, Esq., at Bowen's Prairie, on the evening of Oct. 31st, by Rev. Mr. Kimball, John Dennison Walworth of Anamosa, to Miss Frances A. Crane of Bowen's Prairie. Nov. 2, 1860, p. 3
DIED
In Bowen's Prairie, Dec. 17th, of consumption, Mrs. Mary D. Smith, wife of Capt. Geo. K. Smith, aged 65 years. Dec. 28, 1860, p. 2
by Otis Whittemore
This part of the County of Jones, called Bowen's Prairie, has as early a history as any portion of the County. On the 1st day of May, 1836, Hugh Bowen came, in company with Joshua Johnson, and struck their tent, being the first white settlers upon this Prairie, and in honor to Mr. Hugh Bowen the Prairie was named by the old settlers and it still retains the name. In the year 1838 or 1839 the first meeting was held in the cabin of Barrett Whittemore for the purpose of organizing the County of Jones, and the first election that was held in this county at their first election for delegate to represent them in the Territorial Legislature. A number of those voters came from the south side of the Wapsipinican River. In 1840 B. Whittermore built the first school house in the county, on his premises, and opened school with some 16 scholars, June 21st, 1841.
The first term of this school was 35 weeks and the series of the books used was McGuffey's (at that early day.) The Township Lines were run near this date and three or four of the Northern Townships of Jones were included in our precinct of elections which were held at the cabin of Joseph Green, about a half mile west of the present village of Bowen's Prairie. The elections were held at the same place up to the time Iowa became a State. Forty votes was about an average at that day in the precinct that now comprises the Townships of Castle Grove, Monticello and Richland.
David Graham built the first brick house in the county.
Bowen's Prairie, in or about the year of 1837, was surveyed by the Government and after the Township lines were run, Township 86 N. 2 west of the 5th Principal Meridian took the name of Richland and included most of the first settlers of Bowen's Prairie. In June, 1840, the land sales at Dubuque took place. B. Whittemore was selected to bid of the lands here for the old settlers. Two sections of land were bid off by him at the time. No jumping of claims was allowed by the old settlers of this part of the county. The first frame barn was put up by Hugh Bowen in the year 1844. The same year Otis Whittemore and J.H. Eaton put up the first frame house, begin the first frame buildings put up in this part of the county. The number of heads of families that were here and now comprising Richland Township are as follows (being residents here before Iowa became a State.)
Heads of familiesWm. C. Johnston, Moses Collins, Charles Johnston, Thomas Denson, Wm. More, Thomas Dixon, John O. Sullivan, John Williamson, Robert Snowden, George Snowden, William Brazelton, Frank Dawson, Fletcher Burnght, Wm Tibbits, Mr. Vansant, David Graham, Mr. Allaway, Wm. Hines, Samuel Hines, James Miller, Alexander Laughling, George White, Otis Whitmore.
Single MenHugh Bowen, Barrett Whittemore, Joshua Johnson, John Taylor, J.H. Eaton, Galaspie Laughlin, J.P. Tibbits, James Henderson, Wm. Mickeljohn, Asa Allaway, Wm. Dawson. April 12, 1866
CENTENNIAL EDITION
August 18, 1938

space

space

Several Still Living In Places of Birth
Few persons have been able, all their lives to call "home" the house in which they were born, but several Anamosans may lay claim to this distinction.
Among them are Mary and Margaret Spellman who still stay in the home of their birth. It is of red brick, facing south on Pratt street one block north of the depot. The building was erected in the fall of 1859 by Mr. and Mrs. James Spellman immediately after their marriage, the contractors being Ed and Jonathan Holt of Dubuque.
Since they moved in during the spring of 1860, no other family has ever occupied the home. To the couple there were born the childen of whom Mary and Margaret are the only two living. Mary was born in 1869; she atttended the Anamosa public grade and high schools and became a teacher after graduation. For many years she was primary teacher in Anamosa. Just for one winter when Miss Spellman taught in Castle Grove has she ever been away from her native town.
Mary's sister, Margaret, was born in 1873 and she too, received her schooling in Anamosa. In later years she became a teacher in rural schools about Anamosa, but was never so far away that she could not return home for the week ends.
Parents Came in 1857
The parents of these two are among the earlier settlers. Their mother whose maiden name was Flannery came to Anamosa with her family in 1857. The Flannerys were among the band that organized the first Catholic church on High street in 1858. It was their father, James Spellman who was killed in the Civil war and left his salary of $100 for this religious purpose, to buy brick for the new church. This sum was one of the two cash donations which were made at that time.
Mrs. Spellman lived in the house which her daughters still occupy 70 years before her death. She saw the first train come to Anamosa in 1861, and lived through many changes in the town. It was the home in which, as a bride, she went to live with her husband, and there where her family was born and lived.
Charle Metcalf A Third
Charles Metcalf is a third to be still living in the home in which he was born, but his story is not very similar to that of the Spellmans, for though he says he never thought of any place else as home, he left the house for many intervals while he was attending school or traveling in the west.
His brick home on North Ford street has been changed very little since it was built by his father, Horace C. Metcalf, in 1862. It was the fourth and last house the elder Mr. Metcalf constructed in Anamosa, and was occupied by him and his wife until their death. Of the children born to them there, only two are living, Ellell G. Metcalf of Seattle and Charles Metcalf of this town, who came into being in 1867.
Their father had been among the earlier settlers of eastern Iowa. He came to Linn county in 1841 and to Jones county in 1845. He maintained a store where the waterworks now are. After he had run this mercantile business for 10 years, he organized the First National bank and was elected its president. His business interests increased to include banking, milling, stock raising and grain growing.
Charles Metcalf says that he often went to one of his father's ranches in Nebraska or Wyoming. These trips, together with the time spent away at school, were the only intervals he was away from Anamosa. Throughout these periods. Mr. Metclf says that he never thought of another place as "home".
Asked how he would like to live some place else, he answered, "I wouldn't, I don't believe I could do that. This is the only home I ever knew."
The house, itself, is not so different in appearance on the outside from the time of its construcion in 1862, and one who sees the modern looking interior, would hardly guess that he was in a home over 76 years old.
Snyders Old Residents
Mrs. Stella Heitchen Snyder was born in 1871 in the flat above the present liquor store, and she has never been away from it except for trips and vacations since that time. Her father, Augustus Heitchen bought the building when it was only partially completed from a man named Alderman. That was in 1864, and it has been in the family ever since.
Mrs. Snyder is the only member living of her immediate family. During her lifetime, the five people closest her heart have died and been buried from this home. After her mother, Margaret, and her brother and her sister were gone, Mrs. Snyder said she felt that she and her husband would move to a new location. Though they inspected several properties for sale, they never bought or changed locations.
Mrs. Snyder said simply, "I would come back and look around the house, and find that it was just 'home'. Now my father and my husband are both gone, too, and I wouldn't want to live anywhere else."
The rambling house of New England architecture beneath the pines on South Garnavillo street, is the residence of two sisters who have made it their home since they were born. They are Harriet A. Cunningham and her sister, Emma.
Their father, Dexter Cunningham, born in New York, came to Iowa in 1850 and engaged in farming near Anamosa. He moved to town in the late sixties, went into the implement business and built the house just mentioned. It was put up on the "New England" plan, that is, a new room for another baby.
Though Harriet Cunningham has been away from Anamosa for a number of years, this homestead, fraught with childhood memories, has always been her headquarters. There, the youngest children were born and grew up with their brothers and sisters. There, the fine old furniture has remained the way the sisters knew it during their childhood. The family relics and lovely gifts from other fine old friends and other early families are treasured with the deepest affection. For 40 years, the acre and a half encompassing the house has been maintained as a bird refuge with the native grass, vines, and bushes untouched except for small paths which wind their way among them.
Smiths Live on Hill
The Smith brothers, Clarence and Clyde, have remained all their lives in the home of their birth, the red brick house high on the hill to the right of the Monticello road. Their father, B.F. Smith who owned the Anamosa brickyard, built the house in the late sixties.
Clarence, born in 1878 and Clyde, in 1882, have never lived anywhere else. They went to school in Strawberry Hill and the Anamosa high school, and since that time have done contracting and teaming in the community. Clyde married Elva Sims and they now have two children.
Nette Chadwick and her brother, Joe, both unmarried, have made the large gray house on East Cedar street their home all their lives. The house was built by their father, David Chadwick and his wife Louisa, in 1865. The parents came to Anamosa from the East in 1855. Mr. Chadwick was a native of New Bedford, Massachusetts, and his wife of Union, New York.
When they arrived in Anamosa, they went to live in the house now occupied by the Will Ditch family on Ford street. After spending a short time in each of five other houses, they decided to build and the house which has been in the Chadwick family ever since was constructed. There were born Nette and Joe in the respective years, 1866 and 1879.
Records in Bible
True to the early day custom, the Chadwicks keep the records of their family history in the old Bible, and when asked the date of her brother's birth, Miss Chadwick scurried off for the volume. Miss Chadwick says that only for six weeks has their home been other than on the family property, and that, in 1880 when they lived in the house next door while their own was being remodeled. Otherwise, she has been at home except several years while travelling. Other living members of the family include Herb Chadwick, an Anamosa cabinet maker, and Joe, in the Cedar Rapids Metropolitan Supply company.
Josephine Foley, the present deputy county auditor, is residing in the home at 211 North Ford street which her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.
B. Foley built about 1870. Miss Foley has made it her home during her life, though for several winters she was away from Anamosa during her teaching career.
To conclude the list of people living in the homes in which they were born, is Clyde Barker, who resides in his home at 204 North Huber street. His mother, the former Etta Strawman, came to a farm east of Anamosa from Ohio in 1854, and his father, W. S. Barker came to this town from Olin in 1860. In the summer of 1888, the property was deeded from Anna Merrill to Mrs. Etta Barker.
July 31, 1894, Clyde was born there. Though he spent many years away from Anamosa, this house on Huber was always his home, and since 1926 he has not left it for more than a short time.
The other two living relatives of the immediate family are his brother, Earl Barker in Atlanta, Iowa; and Mrs. Margaret Barker (she married a man with the same name that hers had formerly been) in Pullman, Washington.
All of these persons living in the homes of their birth, feel much the same concerning them. They have an affectionate regard for the house with its memories and childhood associations, and within each of them is a sense of really belonging, of having their roots in a firmer foundation than those that have moved from place to place all through their lives.
Submitted by [an error occurred while processing this directive] from the Anamosa Eureka Centennial Edition, Anamosa, Iowa, August 18, 1938, p. 10, col. 1-3.
[an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive]